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The United States is about to Open the Era of Drone Farming

  2018-08-09

introduce:From China to the United States, drones are on the rise, with express companies and news media companies becoming the first to taste fresh. Amazon has said it will launch a drone "half an hour" service. In the United States, farmers are becoming

From China to the United States, drones are on the rise, with express companies and news media companies becoming the first to taste fresh. Amazon has said it will launch a drone "half an hour" service. In the United States, farmers are becoming users of drones. Whether they are farmland inspections or irrigation network monitoring, drones can play a huge role in improving the productivity of farm workers.

A demonstration of agricultural drones in Maryland recently attracted many “Geek Farmers“ interested in the latest technology, the Associated Press reported. Gus (MikeGeske), of Missouri, said he employs three workers to monitor irrigation systems in farmland and hopes to buy a drone to do so in the future.

Gus said drones will bring huge labor and fuel savings to farms.

Chip-Bowling, president of the National Cotton Growers Association, tested the drones by himself. He said he wants to buy a drone to patrol cotton fields where pesticides are sprayed. Another farmer, Hutchison (BobbyHutchison), said he also wanted to buy a drone to help him improve his patrol efficiency.

It is reported that drones can do a lot of work in the field, such as understanding the growth of crops from the air, spraying pesticides and finding small fields with problems. The uav industry says agriculture will account for 80% of all commercial drones.

Previously, the use of drones in agriculture was not widespread in the United States due to lagging government regulation. But the market for agricultural drones is about to take off as regulators begin to draft it. The Federal Aviation Administration, which still approves commercial drone flights, has approved more than 50 exceptions to agricultural drone flights this year.

AgEagle, a Kansas state company, sells drones and surveillance software, BretChilcott said it received its first order last year and now has hundreds of orders for drones, and its technology is changing rapidly.

Chilcott said, last year, the operator needed to connect to the computer to get data after the drone landed. But now after a few minutes of each flight, all the data will be synchronized to the iPad or other handheld devices, he said.

In agriculture, UAVs can collect data in the air, such as aerial photographs, 3D images of crops, thermal images or field animal distribution. Data that used to be uncollected or could take days is now available in minutes or hours with drones.

Chilcott said drones can detect small crops with problems and farmers can spray and dispose of specific locations, which could make a big difference in traditional agriculture. However, most farmers in the United States are still unable to use drones due to regulatory restrictions.

The U.S. government is working on regulations to regulate drones, which have previously been drafted to limit commercial drones, including agricultural use, to 25 kilograms and fly in the eye of the operator during the day. In addition, the operator must have a qualification test and have basic aviation knowledge. The TSA also has a security background check on the operator.

Thomas-Haun, a UAV industry staff, said the future commercial model for the spread of drones in agriculture is still difficult to judge whether every farm will buy drones or farmers will buy field services from specialized agricultural drone companies.

The farmer, Gus, said he had 13000 acres on his Missouri farm and would not be able to use drones to monitor the farm's irrigation network efficiently if required to fly within the operator's sight. However, he said he will still be concerned about the next development of agricultural drones.

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